Volkswagen are going to keep all 12 brands in spite of “diesel scandal”

Volkswagen are going to keep all 12 brands in spite of “diesel scandal”


Moscow. December 10. German carmaker Volkswagen intends to retain all 12 existing brands, despite the consequences “diesel scandal”, said chief Executive officer of the company Mathias Muller during the first TV interview of all time “disilicate”.

“There is no reason to get rid of assets. We look to the future VW. We want to make the company more modern and open,” he said in an interview with Bloomberg.

In addition to the eponymous brand, the German automaker owned by Volkswagen passenger cars brand Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche, SEAT, Skoda, Ducati motorcycles, trucks MAN, Scania and Volkswagen Commercial.

Muller noted that a survey of more than 100 informants in different divisions of the company revealed new and important to investigate.

The group expects to reach agreement with U.S. regulators, including the originally discovered the fraud protection Agency environmental (EPA) in the coming weeks. On January scheduled his first official visit to the United States in the position of CEO.

Mueller has promised to take care of the preservation of jobs at each plant of Volkswagen worldwide.

Meanwhile, the Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Volkswagen, Hans Dieter Pets during a press conference following the meeting of the Supervisory Board talked about the need to restore confidence in the company and “the fight for every customer”.

In addition, he said, the investigation into the manipulation of data on emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide will affect all employees, top managers will not be able to stay away. “We are constantly looking for responsible, and rest assured, we will call them to account,” said Petch.

Manual VW continues to believe that the number of perpetrators in the scandal is small. In further testing of harmful emissions in vehicles of the brands belonging to the Volkswagen group, will be evaluated by independent experts, said the automaker.

The Volkswagen scandal erupted in September 2015 after the EPA revealed that the company installed in its vehicles with diesel engines are computer programs that during inspections understate the indicators of harmful emissions. In total, the number of vehicles, subject to review, is more than 11 million